popculturebrain:

thedissolve:


“In Godzilla, almost all human action is futile and/or fatal, and the small victories belong almost exclusively to supporting characters (a young boy reuniting with his parents, a scientist finally getting a good look at the majesty of the monster she’s studied all her life). Godzilla is both humanity’s reckoning and its salvation, a response to our unchecked parasitic relationship with the planet and a reminder of our ultimately supporting role as stewards rather than beneficiaries. Steven Spielberg exerts an undeniable influence on the way the film moves, but Hayao Miyazaki’s work best anticipates where it goes. If Jurassic Park is about the perils of playing God, Godzilla responds that just being ourselves is bad enough.”

Some critics have dinged Godzilla for losing track of its human characters, but David Ehrlich posits that that’s simply a function of the film’s status as a “post-human blockbuster.” [Read more…]

I agree with those critics re: the human characters, but this is a smart take.

popculturebrain:

thedissolve:

“In Godzilla, almost all human action is futile and/or fatal, and the small victories belong almost exclusively to supporting characters (a young boy reuniting with his parents, a scientist finally getting a good look at the majesty of the monster she’s studied all her life). Godzilla is both humanity’s reckoning and its salvation, a response to our unchecked parasitic relationship with the planet and a reminder of our ultimately supporting role as stewards rather than beneficiaries. Steven Spielberg exerts an undeniable influence on the way the film moves, but Hayao Miyazaki’s work best anticipates where it goes. If Jurassic Park is about the perils of playing God, Godzilla responds that just being ourselves is bad enough.”

Some critics have dinged Godzilla for losing track of its human characters, but David Ehrlich posits that that’s simply a function of the film’s status as a “post-human blockbuster.” [Read more…]

I agree with those critics re: the human characters, but this is a smart take.

Reblogged from popculturebrain

newsweek:

The Deadly Mission of Boko Haram: They’re in the international spotlight. What do they want?
In February, Boko Haram slaughtered 59 schoolboys by slitting their throats. The horrific incident was reported in the Nigerian press but was largely ignored elsewhere. According to Patrick Smith, editor of the newsletter Africa Confidential, “In the last five years, at least 4,000 to 5,000 people are believed to have died from acts of terrorism, [from] firefights between Nigerian troops and Boko Haram.” Amnesty International says at least 1,500 people have died this year alone.

newsweek:

The Deadly Mission of Boko Haram: They’re in the international spotlight. What do they want?

In February, Boko Haram slaughtered 59 schoolboys by slitting their throats. The horrific incident was reported in the Nigerian press but was largely ignored elsewhere. According to Patrick Smith, editor of the newsletter Africa Confidential, “In the last five years, at least 4,000 to 5,000 people are believed to have died from acts of terrorism, [from] firefights between Nigerian troops and Boko Haram.” Amnesty International says at least 1,500 people have died this year alone.

Reblogged from washingtonpost

theatlantic:

Noah vs. Son of God: The Twin Pitfalls of Biblical Films

“The persons and events in this motion picture are fictitious. Any similarity to actual persons or events is unintentional.” This line, tucked among Noah’s credits in tiny, swirling, Tolkien-esque script, captures something very important about the movie: It was intended as art, not evangelism.
Critics may have dubbed 2014 “the year of the Bible” in Hollywood, but it’s a mistake to group every Biblical flick into one trend: Not all movies that crib their plotlines from the two testaments are alike. In fact, the biggest Biblical hits so far this year, February’s Son of God and last week’s Noah, don’t have much in common at all, other than their roots in the good book. While Son of God is an earnest story of heaven, miracles, and the salvation of the soul, Noah is a human drama, crafting a fantasy-like world into a parable about how people should act.
Read more. [Image: Paramount Pictures]

theatlantic:

Noah vs. Son of God: The Twin Pitfalls of Biblical Films

“The persons and events in this motion picture are fictitious. Any similarity to actual persons or events is unintentional.” This line, tucked among Noah’s credits in tiny, swirling, Tolkien-esque script, captures something very important about the movie: It was intended as art, not evangelism.

Critics may have dubbed 2014 “the year of the Bible” in Hollywood, but it’s a mistake to group every Biblical flick into one trend: Not all movies that crib their plotlines from the two testaments are alike. In fact, the biggest Biblical hits so far this year, February’s Son of God and last week’s Noah, don’t have much in common at all, other than their roots in the good book. While Son of God is an earnest story of heaven, miracles, and the salvation of the soul, Noah is a human drama, crafting a fantasy-like world into a parable about how people should act.

Read more. [Image: Paramount Pictures]

Reblogged from theatlantic